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Does a smaller nozzle guarantee better details?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Jaykav99, May 8, 2018.

  1. Jaykav99

    Jaykav99 New Member

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    Possibly kind of a newb question but I've been printing awhile now and have stuck with the 0.4 diameter nozzles. And now i am getting into objects that need neater finer details...as in small text possibly in crazy fonts or something like small stars as an example.

    Would a smaller diameter nozzle raise the chances of these details coming out correctly?
     
  2. Geof

    Geof Volunteer Moderator
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    Depending on the size of the detail yes. if its to small of a detail for a .4 then a .3 may do it (slice it that way and watch the preview). I typically drop down to a .25 or a .15 (dont do .15 its a PITA). Just remember your extrusion width will almost always be larger than your nozzle say. so .4 = .48 (as an example) then .25 extrusion width would be .33 (as an example). Make sure the details fit into what your after. And dont forget, if you drop nozzle size you must drop speed as well.
     
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  3. Jaykav99

    Jaykav99 New Member

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    Gotcha, thanks for the reply and tip on speed settings
     
  4. Geof

    Geof Volunteer Moderator
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    your welcome. It is alot of fun to play with different size nozzles. just remember you need to tune in your settings for it. (make sure to write them down or save them off before and after you switch, dont want to retune all the time :D)
     
  5. BrooklynBay

    BrooklynBay Active Member

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    A worn down 0.4 nozzle will make a sloppy print. You could try a new 0.4 nozzle while doing a fine print. Compare the print of the new nozzle to your old nozzle if the print quality didn't come out perfect with the old nozzle. One thing that I've learned recently is that if a print doesn't come out correct (poor layer adhesion in patches with missing spots) is to experiment with the nozzle size in the software (not the actual nozzle). For example, I was using a 0.4 nozzle, and my print on a very fine part was brittle with holes. I set the nozzle size to 0.1 in the software, and it printed correctly but it took about 4 times as long to print.
     
  6. WheresWaldo

    WheresWaldo Volunteer ( ͠° ͟ʖ ͡°)
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    @BrooklynBay no that is not the correct way to adjust for print irregularities.

    @Everyone else, you need to make sure your printers are set up mechanically accurate and calibrate so that level one adhesion is good, so that you are not over/under extruding, temperatures are in a proper range, etc. Then switching nozzles is just a case of telling your slicer the nozzle size. I have profiles for 0.40 and 0.60 mm nozzles each with the correct nozzle size selected. All other slicer settings are nearly identical. Once the printer is properly calibrated there shoudl be no need to "fool" the printer by intentionally putting bogus parameters in your slicer settings, If you are resorting to that then you need to rethink you entire setup.
     
  7. Geof

    Geof Volunteer Moderator
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    100% agree. If your wrong mechanically and you try to solve it in software (and the other way around too) its just not good. Band aid fixes will cause you more terror in the long run than just spending the time to fix it right.
     

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