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Image of included Robo USB drive

Discussion in 'Software' started by OutsourcedGuru, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. OutsourcedGuru

    OutsourcedGuru Active Member

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    Hopefully Robo doesn't mind me posting this.

    I've heard that others have misplaced their included Robo-branded USB drive from their kits. Note that there isn't a lot on the drive but I still made an image. I'd suggest the DMG version for the Mac people since that's much smaller in size. (The ISO version is uploading now and will be there eventually.)

    Google Drive -> RoboUSB (dmg or iso)
     
    WheresWaldo and mark tomlinson like this.
  2. Kilrah

    Kilrah Well-Known Member

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    Why make a 4GB drive image when you can just zip the few MBs of content? It's not a system drive with a complex filesystem, just a few files...
     
    #2 Kilrah, Sep 4, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
    mark tomlinson likes this.
  3. OutsourcedGuru

    OutsourcedGuru Active Member

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    True that. I'm guessing that the content weighs in at around 64MB or so. I'm just burning the image because I'm now going to re-purpose that drive and use it to store STL/GCODE files inside the chassis.
     
  4. Kilrah

    Kilrah Well-Known Member

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    32MB of useful data actually, the rest is macOS junk files that there's no point in keeping. Zipped that's 9MB.

    Really makes absolutely no sense to make an image, that you of course can't restore onto a smaller drive either.
    Even if you REALLY wanted to make one who knows why, you would zip the 4GB iso and bring it down to 21MB for distribution.

    The lack of logic and sense of practicality hurts (re the other thread... :D)

    I actually had a bunch more stuff on mine, but I think I didn't keep all of it.

    EDIT:
    Seems I actually have kept what was on there, it's from the printer itself that I deleted samples. Copy here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/bgum5mxp12tuxvo/Robo_R2_USB_06.17.zip?dl=1
     
    #4 Kilrah, Sep 5, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
  5. OutsourcedGuru

    OutsourcedGuru Active Member

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    I must admit that I was excited to open up that gadget box with all the do-dads in it. The boxing/kitting of the printer seems amazing from an almost Apple-worthy effort on appearance.

    They could have loaded up that 4GB with a fair amount of fun, to be honest.
     
  6. OutsourcedGuru

    OutsourcedGuru Active Member

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    In case anyone is comfortable with console commands in Linux/OS X, here's how you can edit file(s) in-place on an image file before burning it to the microSD. You might do this to edit the /etc/hostname file or the /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf file for the wi-fi SSID/password.

    An example session:
    Code:
    $ file raspbian-jessie.img
    raspbian-jessie.img: DOS/MBR boot sector; partition 1 : ID=0xc, start-CHS (0x0,130,3), end-CHS (0x8,138,2), startsector 8192, 129024 sectors; partition 2 : ID=0x3, start-CHS (0x8,138,3), end-CHS (0x213,120,37), startsector 137216, 8400896 sectors
    
    So we’re interested in only one number here, that value after startsector for partition 2, namely 137216. Multiply that by 512 to get 70254592 which we use in the next command:

    Code:
    $ sudo mount raspbian-jessie.img -o offset=70254592 /mnt
    $ sudo nano /mnt/etc/hostname
    $ sudo umount /mnt
    
    That first command means, essentially, “open up the file indicated (at an offset of 7 million or so characters into that file) and show me everything that’s in it and put that in the /mnt folder area”.
     
  7. tkoco

    tkoco New Member

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    Using those Linux commands certainly will get the job done.
    For myself, I first write the image file to a spare SDcard. I unplug the SDcard and reinsert it into my Linux Mint box. Linux Mint automatically mounts the two partitions and gives me access to both partitions via the file manager "Caja". When I am finished, I just eject one of the partitions and the entire SDcard is properly unmounted (ready for use).
     

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