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ABS Robo 3D Black ABS vs. other ABS's

Discussion in 'Printing Filament' started by Kaan, Sep 5, 2014.

  1. Kaan

    Kaan Member

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    Robo 3D Black ABS: Butter
    Octave Brown ABS: Popcorn
    Other Gold ABS: Microwave Popcorn

    I've had great success with the Robo 3D Black ABS that I bought with the device, much much much better results than any PLA test I've done, I've printed many functional stuff with the black ABS, just beautiful filament

    Then I though to myself, yay, ABS works, nope, not the case with other filaments

    I've bought 8 different types of filaments from an AliExpress producer/seller, the Gold ABS was just unprintable, I've tested at 190-235, only at 190, it can be extruded slowly while not popping, it pops extremely at 230

    I've also bought an Octave Brown (same color as Gold) ABS locally, both made in china (all of my filaments are actually) that filament also pops, but not as much

    The seller of the Gold ABS provided 230-270 as the extruder temperature, but I'm guessing my Robo 3D has heat issues, whenever I reach 240, the connection freezes, the extruder starts heating down :(

    What do you guys think?

    (In the filament picture, you can see the switch from the black abs to gold abs, the black abs is flawless, the gold one is just pure flaws) photo 1(1).JPG
     

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  2. mark tomlinson

    mark tomlinson ༼ つ ◕_ ◕ ༽つ
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    Your Firmware max temp is set to 235 (still).
     
  3. Kaan

    Kaan Member

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    Yes I've just noticed that, good to see it's a firmware block

    I've re-tested the Brown ABS, no luck, popping and warping at all temperatures

    Would higher temperatures, an E3D hot-end maybe fix the issue, or am I just buying low quality filaments? :)
     
  4. Paul Yeh

    Paul Yeh Active Member

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    Popping indicates your filament probably absorbed moisture in the filament.
     
  5. Kaan

    Kaan Member

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    Both rolls are new, air-tight packaging and silica insertion seems to be the norm, so having moisture inside is pretty unlucky I guess

    There is an unused oven in the garage, I might heat one of the rolls a bit and test again If I get the oven to work

    My guess was, either not enough temperature or low-quality filaments with bubbles inside
     
  6. mark tomlinson

    mark tomlinson ༼ つ ◕_ ◕ ༽つ
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    ABS generically, as a filament type, is rather a pain to use. Without a heated chamber--more so.

    You need to run it slow and only as hot as needed (less heat the better--takes some experimenting with the spools).
    Thicker shells will help, but even if you do everything right, you may fall victim to warp-n-curl. You will get some, whether or not it is too much onlyt experimentation will tell.
     
  7. Kaan

    Kaan Member

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    I've did more experimentation with the Brown ABS, it actually printed great at high speeds, like 1.2X

    I've noticed this as MatterControl prints the first layer at 30%, the first layer was pretty bubbley, but at 1X, things improved a lot, so I tried 1.2x, and perfection (at 235C)

    The bed was at 60C, so I experienced my first warping too, 85C was great :)

    It might be that, the high temp, the fast extrusion is just what the problematic ABS's need (or low temp and low extrusion speed, I guess the result would be the same, heat absorption-wise)

    (I'm also assuming increasing the print speed automatically syncs the extrusion speed, I leave the extrusion speeds as they are)
     
  8. mark tomlinson

    mark tomlinson ༼ つ ◕_ ◕ ༽つ
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    It is the difference in temperature (Delta-T) between the plastic and the ambient (in our case--the room) that makes the difference. ABS warps more with a high delta-T (cooling faster). If you have a heated chamber you can control the cooling of the entire model better and get less warp.
     
  9. Kaan

    Kaan Member

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    That makes extreme amounts of sense

    The printer is in the attic, the attic is unheated, I guess my 3d printing adventure ends when the winter comes :)
     
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  10. SteveC

    SteveC Well-Known Member

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    Print with PLA in the winter.

    I notice you used support for that filament oiler. It can be printed without support.
     
  11. Kaan

    Kaan Member

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    Thanks for the advice, I have a feeling many things I print can be printed without support, Is there any way to check for that?
     
  12. SteveC

    SteveC Well-Known Member

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    You should be able to bridge from point to point 2 inches or more with no support. A bridge with a hole in it needs support because there is nothing to support the edge of the hole (and it is not really a bridge). Overhangs to steeper than 45º usually print fine. How much steeper than 45º is trial and error. Cooling is important for bridging and overhangs.

    The threads on that oiler are close to 45º.
     
  13. Printed Solid

    Printed Solid Volunteer Admin
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    If you run through the math with a 0.4mm wide bead and Xmm height, you can figure out around what your max overhang angle is. The thinner the layer, the steeper the overhang. People with Ultimakers tend to print at 100 micron or lower most of the time, so Cura defaults to 60 degrees. Most people just use the 45 degree rule of thumb.
     
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