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Changing nozzles

Discussion in 'Mods and Upgrades' started by Simonpackman1, Sep 15, 2015.

  1. Simonpackman1

    Simonpackman1 Member

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    I own a stock ROBO 3D R1 PLUS from june with the all metal hot end. Are there any nozzles I can buy with different diameters. I would like to see how I can change print time with thicker and possible even thinner layers.. Is this possible or do I just have to get an entire new setup?
     
  2. Printed Solid

    Printed Solid Volunteer Admin
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    you can change the nozzle. if you pull off the black rubber boot, around the heater block, it should be pretty easy to see. There are flats on the side. Heat up the nozzle, hold on to the heater block (the part that says hexagon on it) with an adjustable wrench and remove the nozzle with another adjustable wrench.

    I believe this guy sells the hexagon nozzles: https://tamarintech.com/ or you can order direct from reprapdiscount.com

    The E3D V6 nozzles also fit on the hexagon and make a really nice, relatively cheap upgrade as they are better made and available in more sizes and materials. I stock them at printedsolid.com if you're in the US or you can buy from e3d-online.com in the rest of the world.
     
  3. Simonpackman1

    Simonpackman1 Member

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    awesome thanks for the info. Have you used different nozzle sizes on your printer before? If so what sort of results have you seen?
     
  4. Simonpackman1

    Simonpackman1 Member

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    also in the topic of nozzles and extruder compatibility, is there an "easier" route to dual extrusion as far as a mod. I have seen a few but you seem to be the guy to ask.
     
  5. Printed Solid

    Printed Solid Volunteer Admin
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    I have used different size nozzles and am huge advocate of using larger nozzles. IMO, printers should come stock with a 0.5mm nozzle instead of a 0.4. You barely loose any detail, prints are stronger, complete faster, and chances of clogging are reduced quite a bit. It also makes it easier to print some of the filled materials. Lulzbot has started doing that with the taz. Despite what you might hear, you're still completely capably of printing at low layer heights. I've run many prints at 100 microns with me 0.8mm nozzle. If you browse through my thingiverse makes, you'll see some examples of prints with 0.4mm, 0.8mm, and a few at 0.35mm. http://www.thingiverse.com/Printed_Solid/makes

    As far as dual goes, there isn't really anything easier about dual. You really have to be into it and wanting to go that route. There is a fair amount of work in making the mod and then there is a lot of work in dialing things in so that you are getting decent prints. The Mosaic Pallet is on the way in the not too distant future. That machine splices filament as it feeds so that you get multifilament printing without modifying your printer. Not sure what price is looking like though...
     
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  6. daniel871

    daniel871 Well-Known Member

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    The kickstarter price to actually get the Mosaic was $600. Which really isn't all that expensive by the time you compare that to the time and trouble of printing the modified carriages, buying additional E3D hotends and all the assorted nozzles, the additional stepper motor, drive gear and extruder body printing and wiring and fan extender for the Robo. Plus all of the crimping/soldering tools needed if you don't have them already.

    The biggest portion of this is the time spent on changing everything over properly if the person doing it has no experience whatsoever tinkering. To say nothing of the hassle some folks have getting their PC to even recognize the Robo when running Arduino software on 64-bit machines.

    That said, I'd really suggest that the OP not try to do the dual modification until they get comfortable doing single color prints. There is a surprising learning curve that all printer manufacturers pretend don't apply to their printers that the OP needs to get around first.

    After the OP has figured out settings for printing parts with detachable supports in various single color prints and done it reliably, that would be a good point to look again at going dual extruder and deciding if it's really worth the trouble.

    Especially since the only two benefits to going dual extruder are:

    1. Printing where the supports are printed in a dissolvable material--good for complex things like skeletons of sci-fi/fantasy creatures, but not much else.
    2. Printing in two different color filaments at the same time--really a great deal more limited than people think.
    I'm only doing it to my Robo because I've gone so far from stock there is no putting it back, but I wouldn't recommend a newbie go down this path at all.
     
  7. mark tomlinson

    mark tomlinson ༼ つ ◕_ ◕ ༽つ
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    Yea, PAINT is such a difficult thing :)

    IMHO, multiple extrusion is for multiple materials only. Multiple colors is, well, silly innit*?


    *considering the technical challenges with multiple extrusion and slicing/modeling... To do that just for color seems odd to me.
     
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  8. jbigler1986

    jbigler1986 Active Member

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    Hey. I like dual colors ok.
     
  9. mark tomlinson

    mark tomlinson ༼ つ ◕_ ◕ ༽つ
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    No denying that, but it seems like a silly proposition to go through the expense and effort of dual extrusion only for multiple colors.

    As a side-effect? Sure, why not :)
     
  10. daniel871

    daniel871 Well-Known Member

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    I hear "print in two colors!" far more than "print in two materials!" when people aren't talking about dissolvable supports though.
     
  11. mark tomlinson

    mark tomlinson ༼ つ ◕_ ◕ ༽つ
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    Which tells you a lot :)
     
  12. Simonpackman1

    Simonpackman1 Member

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    my main motivation is being able to print support material that dissolves. I mostly build enclosures for electronics, but would like to expand on overhangs and detail without losing detail. I also thought it would be neat to keep one nozzle at 0.4 and another at a higher diameter for support and for fast prints.
     
  13. Printed Solid

    Printed Solid Volunteer Admin
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    You may want to consider spending your dual $$ on a simplify 3d license instead then. Easy support removal and you can set it so that, for example, it prints infill twice as wide, but only prints it every 2-3 layers so you would be getting the same effect.
    Dual is cool to play around with, but I wouldn't rely on it, in its current state, for anything other than experimentation.
     
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  14. mark tomlinson

    mark tomlinson ༼ つ ◕_ ◕ ༽つ
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    Cool. Multi-material totally makes sense.

    Werd.

    Even the few times I had internal supports, if I could reach them with hemostats they popped right off.
     
  15. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    yeah simplify 3d supports are generally better and less effort than dual extrusion. Cost is about the same without all the added headache of duals
     
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  16. Simonpackman1

    Simonpackman1 Member

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    I actually have simplify 3D
     
  17. Simonpackman1

    Simonpackman1 Member

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    I have it tuned pretty well but I feel like I could really expand my printers capabilities with solid supports. Right now I get very little noticeable artifacts on my prints from the simplify supports, but I have had issues with certain prints. I think if I ever do this mod it will be a long way down the road. I also was thinking I could use some of the more exotic filaments for perimeters and solid layers and then infill with with pla to save those rolls of more expensive filament.
     
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  18. Printed Solid

    Printed Solid Volunteer Admin
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    That's an interesting approach.
     
  19. daniel871

    daniel871 Well-Known Member

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    It's definitely something that's there in Simplify though. My customized Robo dual setup has the option of using a specific nozzle for infill and supports and doing perimeters with the other so it's definitely something that's possible.
     
  20. Simonpackman1

    Simonpackman1 Member

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    I am pretty tech/software/hardware savvy. I built large structures and have wire houses and electronics. I am currently building a CNC machine. I think I would be capable of adding a dual extruder, but I definitely fear the long troubleshooting process.
     

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