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Hexagon Hot End?

Discussion in 'Mods and Upgrades' started by Red Submarine, Mar 20, 2014.

  1. Bradley

    Bradley New Member

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    So i will have to look at the BSPT fittings with metric pitch? Any websites you can suggest Mike?
     
  2. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    Nope they're not BSPT (british standard pipe thread) but rather M6 or ANSI Metric. If you're in america I find most metric stuff on McMaster.com but amazon is also a good resource.
     
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  3. Galaxius

    Galaxius Well-Known Member

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  4. 1d1

    1d1 Active Member

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    Latest update on my Hexagon: We have failed each other. After months of trouble free printing I noticed I was struggling to get a good first layer. As my glass bed is broken, I have been using a piece of Garolite and when both my heated bed went down and I started having problems, I blamed the Garolite. Nope. The mighty Hex was wobbling in its heat block. Then, when I took it out to fiddle and see if I could somehow fix that, I broke it at the heat break. Good-bye Hex. I resurrected my e3d, cleaned it up, straightened it out, did a little smoothing here and there and I'm back in business. I did one other change and installed self-centering z rod couplers which I will post in another thread.
     
  5. TCZ8

    TCZ8 New Member

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    Hi 1d1, i was just about to order some hexagon I'd love if you could share more details on the failure. Was the hexagon breaking a result of your repair attempt or wear/defect ?

    Did you figure out why the hex was wobbling? Got pics?

    Thank you.
     
  6. Leon Grossman

    Leon Grossman Active Member

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    Based on what everyone was noticing about the press fit heat break, I wouldn't touch a Hexagon for free. Of course, I'm the guy who bailed on the E3D due to it's multi-part construction...
     
  7. Paul Yeh

    Paul Yeh Active Member

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    I thought that they changed the original press fit heat break design (don't know the reason why) to a heat break with a screw? The later design may have heat transfer issue unless you put some kind of thermal cement on it.
     
  8. 1d1

    1d1 Active Member

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    Mine was an early beta design that I received for testing purposes. I believe the current ones do not rely on a press fit heat break. What is amazing to me is how many hours of printing it managed before finally getting iffy. I will order another soon and even pay for it this time. I think it is a worthy design for the price and am glad that the newest ROBO's are using these now. As far as pics go, it is just what you might imagine a hollow stainless screw that has snapped looks like. I have managed to do this on both e3d and Hexagon hot ends so I'm something of an experienced user; they both snap easily when manhandled.
     
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  9. Datum

    Datum New Member

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    I also twisted my E3d heat break when installing it. Had to order a new heat break and carefully tighten it up. The design lends itself to warping or breaking when tightening it up.
     
  10. Galaxius

    Galaxius Well-Known Member

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    Here's a pic if the hexagon with the M6 push fitting attached.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Robert Choban

    Robert Choban Active Member

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    I have a newer Robo R1 printer with the enclose bottom. Can someone look at this picture and give my an idea of what might be going on. The blue filament blob on top happened about an hour into the print. If I scape it off and start over after another hour same blue blob shows up. Not sure if something came loose and if I need to tighten something.
     

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  12. Galaxius

    Galaxius Well-Known Member

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    You need to tighten the heater block to the heat break. Because you've already run filament through it you might need to do it hot. The hexagon assembly video is here.
    http://forums.robo3dprinter.com/index.php?threads/Galaxius'-Printer.2903/#post-24159
     
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  13. collin

    collin New Member

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    that's straight up resourceful.
     
  14. 1d1

    1d1 Active Member

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    It worked for a long time, but not very pretty.
     
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  15. Robert Choban

    Robert Choban Active Member

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    Galaxius
    I looked at the video and I still have a few questions,
    1. My heater block has a black rubber guard material covering the outside of it, not sure if I have to take off this black rubber protection in order to tighten the heater block to the heat break.
    2. The cables look like they are glued onto the black rubber piece and, I'm not sure how to remove it.
    3. The filament looks like it has spread under the rubber piece, not sure how to get that filament out without removing the black covering. Do you think I should heat up the extruder before trying to remove the filament or just try to chip away the filament on the top of the heater block when it is cold. I'm also concerned about breaking wires.
    Any suggestion on how to approach this would be greatly appreciated.
    Please see the attached pictures
     

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    #295 Robert Choban, Oct 6, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 6, 2014
  16. Galaxius

    Galaxius Well-Known Member

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    Wow that's a mess.

    Try not to damage the black silicon insulator jacket. You should be able to tighten the heater block without removing it I think but be careful. There's pics in the thread of my printer, where the video was, that I show fitting the silicon jacket to my hexagon. They might give you a better understanding of that part of the assembly.

    Is it glue or just melted filament that escaped from around the cables? It also looks like the thermistor has been fitted incorrectly. It should be installed via the small hole in the side of the jacket, though the way it's installed means it won't come loose but you'll have to be careful if you remove the jacket that the wires for the thermistor don't break as they're quite fragile.

    Honestly, if that was my print head I'd remove the glue, if it is glue, then remove the heater cartridge and black silicon jacket. Then reinsert the heater cartridge and heat up the heater block. Remove the tension screws on the extruder and pull you filament out once the hotend is up to 180C. Then using some paper towel or something clean the heater block and then using a small spanner and some padded multi-grips tighten the heater block as shown in the video. Make sure you put the black jacket back on when you reassemble it after cleaning.

    I wish you all the luck with cleaning it up. It really is an excellent hotend. I hope you avoid breaking the heater cartridge and thermistor wires.
     
  17. Robert Choban

    Robert Choban Active Member

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    Galaxius, Thanks for your response, a few more question, hope you don't mine
    1. Should the first thing I do, is heat up the hot end and then remove the filament
    2. do you think it would easier to remove the caked up filament on the hot end when it is hot or when it is cold.
    3. In your previous post with the video you talked about different screws and bolts you use, where do you buy them.
    "When you fit the fan bracket I recommend replacing the stock extruder mounting screws with socket heads (20mm or 25mm M4). I'm only using socket heads now as they're much much easier to work with. I bought 10 of every size between 8mm and 40mm M3 in stainless steel and a heap of nyloc nuts, they're not very expensive.
    4. If I end up messing up the thermiostor and the heater, where can I get a new one, do I have to buy the whole kit. Do you know how much the whole kit cost
     
  18. Galaxius

    Galaxius Well-Known Member

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    Sure.
    1. Yes. 180C should do.
    2. I'm not sure how much the filament will stick to the heat block. You might be lucky that it just peels off of the heat block when cold. The filament doesn't really stick to the silicon jacket so you might be able to get that off while it's cold first, would be safer for your fingers too.
    3. I live in Australia and got mine from The Bolt Place. Most hardware stores should stock them or at least point you in the right direction. Definitely get stainless steel socket heads, it's well worth the extra cents.
    4. You can get the thermistor and/or heater cartridge from ebay, or if you're in the US @Printed Solid should be able to hook you up. You don't have to buy the whole kit. I'm not sure what the specs are for the thermistor and heater cartridge for the hexagon but Printed Solid or @Mike Kelly should know, or a forum search.

    It might be easier to work on and clean by removing the hotend from the X carriage but you'll definitely need to remove the filament first and I would recommend getting the socket head bolts before re-installing the hotend as it will be a billion times easier.
     
  19. Robert Choban

    Robert Choban Active Member

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    Galaxius
    I have been looking over your pictures and I'm still a little confused about how the hotend attaches to the X carriage. There is a lot of parts surrounding the hotend. I know I have to remove the heat sink fan, what about the bigger fan, does that have to be remove to get at the hotend. Is there anything else that needs to be remove before removing the hotend. Does the hotend slip out or are the bolts or screws holding it in place, it's really hard to see. In your video it looks like you removed the entire X axis chassis, is that the only way to get at the hotend for removal.
     
  20. Galaxius

    Galaxius Well-Known Member

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    It will be easier to work on with the X carriage removed but should be doable leaving it in place. I would probably try leaving it in place first but sit a magazine on the bed first to reduce the chance of it cracking/chipping if you drop a tool or something on it.
    Below are the 2 screws that secure the hotend. You definitely want to replace these with socket heads.
    I don't think you'll need to remove the fans but if you do the screws holding their brackets on are located from underneath but be careful removing both of them at the same time as the screws also hold the extruder onto the X carriage. You'll have to remove the fan before you can remove the fan bracket. These 2 screws are M4 I think as opposed to most of them which are M3.
    This will be a great exercise for you as you'll learn heaps about your printer. Upgrading my hotend was a bit scary for me at first but I'm glad I did it as I know a lot more about my printer now.

    [​IMG]
     
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