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E3D v6 Information, Installation Guides, and Review

Discussion in 'Mods and Upgrades' started by Mike Kelly, Oct 23, 2014.

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  1. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    Moderator update 2/7/17: This thread contains Mike's original review of the V6 at launch time and community discussion around various upgrades. Current curated instructions are collected here.


    Note: This topic relates only to the 1.75mm version as the robo does not use 3mm filament.

    Background and Review

    Let's start with the basics:

    E3D v6: What is it?
    E3D had a very popular v5 hot end, but not being content with the design they looked at ways to improve upon it.

    The v5 is has an entirely metal hot end. The only non-metal components are on the bowden version which uses a plastic coupling with a bore through PTFE tube.

    [​IMG]

    The v6 follows this trend, but the PTFE tube goes further into the heatsink, and butts up against the cold end of the heat break.

    What makes it unique?

    This video does a great job of going over all the enhancements of the v6, but I'll break them down as well:



    Height:
    The most obvious change is that the E3Dv6 is considerably shorter than the v5. Previously from end to end of the direct feed E3D was a total height of 70mm while the bowden version required a total height of 82mm . In contrast the E3Dv6 is 63mm for both direct and bowden.
    [​IMG]
    If we compare this to the hexagon, we find the hexagon's direct drive is shorter at 55.2mm but the bowden connector is bigger for a total length of 71mm, though the hexagon's heatsink is "universal" as well, with an adapter.
    [​IMG]


    Bore:

    The short length of the E3Dv6 is due to the clever integration of pneumatic, push to fit connectors. This allows for 4mm tube to be fed through and into the heatbreak which has been bored out to fit it.

    [​IMG]

    What this means is that there's a consistent 2mm of space for the filament from the moment it goes into the PTFE tube, to when it reaches the nozzle.

    If we compare this to the Hexagon, that uses a 1.8mm bore with a steel heatbreak/tube combo. This bore leaves only .25mm tolerance around the filament meaning oversized filament will jam easier.

    [​IMG]

    Thermistor
    The E3D brings about a new method of securing the thermistor. Instead of using tapes or messy silicone/adhesives, the E3Dv6 has a simple screw in method for securing the thermistor.

    **In mid 2016, E3D upgrade this to a simpler method using a cartridge style thermistor. If you have a newer E3D and a newer R1+, you may find that the thermistor cartridge from the R1+ fits nicely into the E3D heater block and that you can keep the E3D thermistor as a spare. This is fine. However, when you do install the E3D thermistor you will need to adjust the thermistor type per instructions further down. **

    [​IMG]

    You simply press fit the thermistor in place with sleeve jackets on the wires, then using a m3 screw you clamp down the wires onto the body. Creates a solid connection that's very easy to swap in and out of. Now redoing wiring is not intimidating at all.

    Heater Cartridge:

    Unlike the v5 and Hexagon, the v6 moves away from securing the heater cartridge using a set screw. Instead they use a clamp method to secure it. What this allows for is an increased point of contact between the heater block which reduces the power required and improves heat up times. This does have the obvious downside of a very large heater block, but puts the heater closer to the nozzle.

    [​IMG]


    Fan Shroud:

    Being an all metal hotend it is imperative to have active cooling on the heatsink. The v6 sticks with the previous 30mm fan, but this time has a custom injection molded fan shroud. This makes for a much easier and cleaner install. Especially considering the hexagon does not come with a fan shroud.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    It also looks very nice in my opinion

    Nozzle:

    Arguably the most important improvement on the E3Dv6 is the new nozzle design.

    Previously the nozzle had one transition, a 2mm drill to the final nozzle diameter, typically 4mm. This creates for a very hard transition from size. The v6 adds a second transition. This reduces the amount of torque required to extrude filament and reduces the likelyhood of jamming.

    [​IMG]

    Purchasing

    The style of E3D is a direct feed (or universal) and 12v

    The E3D v6 can be purchased from these outlets:

    http://e3d-online.com/E3D-v6/Full-Kit/v6-1.75mm-Universal
    http://printedsolid.com/collections/accessories-and-upgrades/products/e3d-hot-end-kit-v6


    Do not buy from Ebay as they are poor quality knock offs and will have issues eventually. Be sure the seller is approved: http://e3d-online.com/Genuine-Check

    Assembly Instructions

    E3D has a very detailed and thorough assembly documentation here: http://e3d-online.com/E3D-v6-Assembly


    Along with that, Tom made a very nice assembly video here:




    Installation

    Installing the E3Dv6 on the robo3d is relatively simple. There's a few gotchas to be aware of before you get started.

    Step 1: Removal

    **Important: If you have a R1+ with quick release plase, you will need to print a new quick release adapter before disassembly. This one works well. http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1192896**


    To begin with the question often comes up "How Do I remove my old hot end?" The answer is pretty simple. There are two screws holding the hot end in place for pre R1+ models and a simple slide out quick release plate on the R1+.

    [​IMG]

    The attachment works by the screws thread into the heatsink's J-head slot itself. This physically deforms the metal but provides a secure connection. Try not to take it out too many times or else it can cause it to become loose.

    Step 2: Parts Fan Holder

    Secondly, you'll need to print a new parts fan holder. It is advisable to do this BEFORE installing the E3D to save on installation time. The fan holder can easily be printed in PLA without using a parts fan. Obviously ABS is ideal as a fan is not suggested for ABS prints:

    There are a few on thingiverse to choose from:

    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:186027
    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:480350
    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:226998

    Let me know if there are others to add to this list.

    To remove the stock fan holder and fan remove the two screws here. While you have these out follow the steps below to drill out for the PTFE tube. Use the 30mm v6 fan

    [​IMG]

    This is what it will look like all said and done:
    [​IMG]


    Step 3: Wiring

    The third gotcha is the wiring. The v6 comes with long enough wires to not need to modify anything, though some users might want to use the stock clips. These are considered Waterproof JST connectors and can be found on amazon or ebay: http://www.amazon.com/10Pairs-13cm-2Pins-Female-Connector/dp/B00MJVKKKI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1414095279&sr=8-2&keywords=Waterproof JST connector

    If you prefer to run the wires back to the board you can follow this wiring guide, making sure to connect to the hot end positions:
    [​IMG]

    Step 4: Making it fit and the PTFE tube

    The fourth would be "What do I do with the PTFE tube?"

    To Start, the PTFE tube is CRITICAL for the hotends operations. If you don't use the PTFE there's a very good chance of jamming or buckling of the filament. Definitely include it.

    At a minimum trim the PTFE at the top of the pneumatic fitting. I don't advise this as it can be difficult to insert filament and negates the real benefits offered by the v6, such as flexible materials.

    Instead I suggest you modify the Greg's Wade Extruder base piece, by drilling out a 4.2mm hole or a #20 drill bit. This will allow for the PTFE to be fed up to just beneath the hobbed bolt. You'll then trim away filament just below the bolt to allow for as seemless of a transition from the hob to the nozzle:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    To ensure the pneumatic fitting isn't being pressed against the carriage, I also advise you counterbore the seat for the J-head with a 9/32" (~7mm) drill bit to about 3mm deep. you can go deeper without any issue, but just enough to allow the flat on the j-head to press up against the greg's wade.

    [​IMG]


    After drilling out the hole it should like this:
    [​IMG]

    You may also see the 30mm fan butts up against the M4 screw that secure the extruder assembly. It should be fine though if it presses down a bit.

    Step 5: Hot End Fan

    The final is "Where to plug in the hot end fan"

    The Fan however requires a dedicated 12v supply. You can run the fan off of these ports .

    This one is preferred as it is fuse protected from the PSU:

    [​IMG]

    This one is less preferred but still what most people do as it doesn't require a connector and still works fine as long as you're careful to prevent shorts:

    [​IMG]

    Firmware:

    The final step of installing the E3D is modifying the firmware. The conversion is pretty simple and only 2 values are being changed.

    Note: If you are using the stud thermistor from printedsolid.com, no firmware changes are required because the EPCOS thermistor it comes with is the same as on the stock Hexagon.

    Max Temp: 290-330 (I don't suggest going over 320 as the thermistors accuracy quickly drops off over 300)
    Sensor Type: 5 (for semitec thermistor)

    Code:
    // When temperature exceeds max temp, your heater will be switched off.
    // This feature exists to protect your hotend from overheating accidentally, but *NOT* from thermistor short/failure!
    // You should use MINTEMP for thermistor short/failure protection.
    #define HEATER_0_MAXTEMP 310    //Change this value only
    #define HEATER_1_MAXTEMP 275
    #define HEATER_2_MAXTEMP 275
    #define BED_MAXTEMP 85
    Code:
    #define TEMP_SENSOR_0 5    //Change this value only
    #define TEMP_SENSOR_1 0
    #define TEMP_SENSOR_2 0
    #define TEMP_SENSOR_BED 1   //robo
     
    #1 Mike Kelly, Oct 23, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 7, 2017
  2. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    My Review:

    The E3Dv6 is a notable improvement over the v5. It does a lot of things very well and only has a few drawbacks. I would start by saying I don't think that upgrading to a v6 over a v5 is necessary, with a few exceptions.

    If you want to print flexible material there is no better option on the market.

    Or if you want to increase the printable height vs the v5.

    I do recommend swapping your v5 nozzle with a v6 should it ever jam badly on you.

    The E3Dv6 costs a bit more than the hexagon, but the simplification and strength of the assembly more than makes up for the cost in my opinion. Especially when you consider the need to figure out a custom fan mount for the hexagon.

    Being an all-metal hot end it still struggles at times to print PLA. It's definitely better but PLA is the king of jamming. Seasoning the nozzle and adding an in-line oiler is a definite must if you plan on printing with a lot of PLA.

    It's a beast with ABS and other materials like HIPS and Nylon. The 2mm diameter also helps with out of spec filament, though it does expand more in the melt zone which can be a bit tricky to pull through if there's a spot less than 2mm.

    Thanks to E3D for the great stock photo's and allowing me to try it out. I look forward to seeing what they come out with in the future.

    Hope this helps!
     
    #2 Mike Kelly, Oct 23, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 23, 2014
  3. Juan Hernandez

    Juan Hernandez New Member

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    Thank you! It is a very useful guide, but I have a problem in the end,
    Everything seems perfect until I started to print, the printer does the auto leveling as usual but when starting to print the hotend just go too far away from the bed and starts to extrude in the air.

    I have a new R1 that just bought a month ago so I used the first firmware M8_E3D, it seems like the problem is with the firmware but I don't know

    I can't upload a pic but here is:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/3hizxv2xnvwa6gv/print.JPG?dl=0
     
  4. robert sanchez

    robert sanchez Active Member

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    Trying changing your z offset. Mine was doing fine then it started printing high so I set it to 0 in matter control.
     
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  5. Juan Hernandez

    Juan Hernandez New Member

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    You mean the home z offset in the EEProm Configuration right?
    I check it and it was already 0 so I tried some other numbers but I really didn't see any change and restore it the configuration but it continue printing in the air
     
  6. robert sanchez

    robert sanchez Active Member

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    In MatterControl 1.1, under slice settings, printer, Z Offset
    Change the value, I had to end up changing mine to 0, because it started printing in the air after it ran the auto bed leveling.
     
  7. Printed Solid

    Printed Solid Volunteer Admin
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    Awesome Mike. I will definitely be bookmarking this and referring people over.

    I'd like to point something very important out in this picture. You can see that there is a small gap between the nozzle and the heater block. This gap is important for proper assembly. If you have a gap there as shown in the picture and also have the nozzle torqued down, you are guaranteed to have a tight connection between the heat break. This applies equally to E3D, Hexagon, and any other hot end.

    If you don't have this gap, you might have the nozzle tightened securely to the heat block, but still have a small (or big) gap between the heat break and nozzle. When this happens, molten plastic can melt up and over the heater block.
     
  8. Juan Hernandez

    Juan Hernandez New Member

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    Thank you very much Robert, that was the problem and now is working right
     
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  9. Tal'set

    Tal'set New Member

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    What is the correct version ? v6 HotEnd 12V or 24V?

    Thanks!

     
  10. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    12v
     
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  11. Tal'set

    Tal'set New Member

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    Thanks Mike Kelly!
    One question,extruder heater and cooling fan are connected in same pins D10 ?
     
  12. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    The heater cartridge does plug into the same D10 pins. The Fan however requires a dedicated 12v supply. You can run the fan off of these ports .

    This one is preferred as it is fuse protected from the PSU:

    [​IMG]

    This one is less preferred but still what most people do as it doesn't require a connector and still works fine as long as you're careful to prevent shorts:

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Darrell

    Darrell Member

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    Are those links correct? Shouldn't the bottom 2 links be swapped? It looks like you have the Auto Level link on the Beta line and vice versa.
     
  14. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    The only difference between beta printer firmwares and autolevel firmwares is that Autolevel has the Z_endstop_inversion set to True, because the switches run in parallel. They refer to these as "R1's" now for some reason on the firmware as of about august.

    Auto_Level_Series_6_10 works for both autolevel printers with the wires done in series, or for Beta printers with a screw contacting a mechanical switch. The only difference between an auto level firmware and a non is the values are input for the autolevel and it homes in the center.

    Personally I think homing in the center is best because that's where 99% of your printing will start.

    6_10 also has some speed values adjusted to better tune the robo as well as a temp_fall error alert to catch a loose thermistor.
     
  15. Darrell

    Darrell Member

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    Thank you for responding. Just to be clear, since I will be using the firmware you provided; there's no need for me to run PID Auto Tune; correct?
     
  16. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    I have not configured the PID values as they can vary from person to person. These will still work with a slight overshoot.
     
  17. Darrell

    Darrell Member

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    So if I run the PID Auto Tune, where and how do I modify the numbers permanently in the firmware
     
  18. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    http://reprap.org/wiki/PID_Tuning does a great job explaining it

    In configuration.h it goes in the field at the bottom

    Code:
    // PID settings:
    // Comment the following line to disable PID and enable bang-bang.
    #define PIDTEMP
    #define BANG_MAX 255 // limits current to nozzle while in bang-bang mode; 255=full current
    #define PID_MAX 255 // limits current to nozzle while PID is active (see PID_FUNCTIONAL_RANGE below); 255=full current
    #ifdef PIDTEMP
      //#define PID_DEBUG // Sends debug data to the serial port.
      //#define PID_OPENLOOP 1 // Puts PID in open loop. M104/M140 sets the output power from 0 to PID_MAX
      #define PID_FUNCTIONAL_RANGE 10 // If the temperature difference between the target temperature and the actual temperature
                                      // is more then PID_FUNCTIONAL_RANGE then the PID will be shut off and the heater will be set to min/max.
      #define PID_INTEGRAL_DRIVE_MAX 255  //limit for the integral term
      #define K1 0.95 //smoothing factor within the PID
      #define PID_dT ((OVERSAMPLENR * 8.0)/(F_CPU / 64.0 / 256.0)) //sampling period of the temperature routine
    
    // If you are using a pre-configured hotend then you can use one of the value sets by uncommenting it
    // Ultimaker
        #define  DEFAULT_Kp 22.2
        #define  DEFAULT_Ki 1.08
        #define  DEFAULT_Kd 114
    
    // MakerGear
    //    #define  DEFAULT_Kp 7.0
    //    #define  DEFAULT_Ki 0.1
    //    #define  DEFAULT_Kd 12
    
    // Mendel Parts V9 on 12V
    //    #define  DEFAULT_Kp 63.0
    //    #define  DEFAULT_Ki 2.25
    //    #define  DEFAULT_Kd 440
    #endif // PIDTEMP

    Change these values
    Code:
    // Ultimaker
    #define DEFAULT_Kp 22.2
    #define DEFAULT_Ki 1.08
    #define DEFAULT_Kd 114
     
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  19. printern00b

    printern00b New Member

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    Stupid question but is the new parts fan holder somehow mandatory for mounting the E3Dv6? I recently ordered an E3Dv6 but yesterday my stock extruder (beta printer) died (probably the PTFE tube broke, now it's leaking between PTFE tube and heater block) so I can't print the new fan holder.
     
  20. danjomite

    danjomite New Member

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    Hi, I have a kickstarter edition printer. I tried to install this yesterday and the thermistor that was included with the v6 basically crumbled in my hands. Can I use the thermistor that originally came with the Robo3D?
     
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